About

The embodiment of courage that turns what seems to be tragic and often times normal into something bearing a striking resemblance to silver linings is echoed in the musical experience created by Montshodaw. His undaunted lyrics and production style brings a freshness to the homogeneous artistic atmosphere in the current arena of hip-hop. Like a scientist observing tissue cultures under a microscope to determine the causal agent of beneficial or infectious growth. Examining sectors of everyday human culture and exposing actions, thought forms, and ideas that hinder us from growing to greatness is not an uncommon phenomenon in his artistry. Alternatively and definitely not of less value, his music celebrates the richness of life through relationships.

His work is one of a dynamic terrain. In compositions like “Sunny Day” and “I’m a Rise,” he advocates that success is in our own hands and that happiness is obtainable within our own being, despite anything else. While portraits of an urban existence revealing thoughts implanted in our minds and accepted without examination of its value that keeps us from transcending pain, egotism, arrogance, and materialism are on display in songs like “Rancid” and “What Dey Say.” He shares his conviction of the importance for creating social harmony via building and maintaining intimate relationships, appreciating the inner beauty of women, and admiring the sacred intermingling of feminine and masculine energies in the songs entitled “Bust Dat Down, Black Rose, and Juke joint.”

On the other hand in the song “I Cain’t Believe” he details an all too familiar family circumstance where signs of wrongdoing are disregarded. Family members are neglected, which allows continued abuse and sometimes the loss of life. Indulging in illegitimate pleasures is often what creates such social-ills. These pleasures are expounded on in a quasi-griot fashion in the song entitled “Da Truth.”

The aim of Montshodaw’s current work is to provide the listener with the understanding that we are not impotent and at the mercy of ill thoughts, feelings, or negative societal activities. He urges us to see that we have the freedom to choose a way of action that uplifts. His music points us in that direction.